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  1. Prenuptial Agreements - Marriage contract and cohabitation agreement information.
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Ontario Family Law Act

Section 56 - Contracts Subject to Best Interests of Child
(1) In the determination of a matter respecting the education, moral training or custody of or access to a child, the court may disregard any provision of a domestic contract pertaining to the matter where, in the opinion of the court, to do so is in the best interests of the child.

[Regardless of any agreement reached, the court always has the right to change any child custody or access arrangements.]

(1.1) In the determination of a matter respecting the support of a child, the court may disregard any provision of a domestic contract or paternity agreement pertaining to the matter where the provision is unreasonable having regard to the child support guidelines, as well as to any other provision relating to support of the child in the contract or agreement.

[Regardless of any agreement reached, the court always has the right to change any child support arrangements.]

(2) A provision in a domestic contract to take effect on separation whereby any right of a party is dependent upon remaining chaste is unenforceable, but this subsection shall not be construed to affect a contingency upon marriage or cohabitation with another.

(3) A provision in a domestic contract made before the 1st day of March, 1986 whereby any right of a party is dependent upon remaining chaste shall be given effect as a contingency upon marriage or cohabitation with another.

(4) A court may, on application, set aside a domestic contract or a provision in it,
(a) if a party failed to disclose to the other significant assets, or significant debts or other liabilities, existing when the domestic contract was made;
(b) if a party did not understand the nature or consequences of the domestic contract; or
(c) otherwise in accordance with the law of contract.

[These are some of (but not all) the circumstances in which a marriage contract, cohabitation agreement or separation agreement can be set aside by the court.]

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